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Block immature virus capsids produce or are expected to develop new HIV therapies

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Industry dynamics
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2017/12/15 10:07
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[Abstract]:
Researchers from the University of Delaware and the University of Pittsburgh recently discovered a special "brake" mechanism or process that effectively interferes with the conversion of HIV into an i
Researchers from the University of Delaware and the University of Pittsburgh recently discovered a special "brake" mechanism or process that effectively interferes with the conversion of HIV into an infectious agent that effectively inhibits viral surface coat protein The first study was published in the journal Nature Communications. The results of this study are based on a detailed study of HIV structure and dynamics in early and late life cycles by researchers. Researchers can experimentally detect the molecular trajectories of viruses.   
 
Professor Tatyana Polenova said that researchers are often accustomed to studying the fixed structure of the virus, but the virus is not rock-like. In this study, we used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to identify each of the HIV structures The location of the atoms, and how these atoms move. Viruses such as HIV and their constituent proteins, nucleic acids, are inherently dynamic and undergo constant expansion and contraction, and these movements are like breathing.
 
As HIV begins to develop, a series of cascading events occur that affect the virus's structure and ability to infect by integrating solid and liquid NMR techniques, state-of-the-art computer simulation and cryogenic electron microscopy, The researchers analyzed in depth the final steps in the HIV virus maturation, during which non-infectious immature virus particles are transformed into infectious virus particles.
 
The researchers found that a peptide molecule called spacer peptide 1 (SP1) exists in a highly motile structure that is cleaved by the viral protease; during the researchers' simulations, this Peptides act like a thin line that adheres to a fixed helical ribbon that will always be present in the final stages of virus maturation. Once SP1 is cleaved, HIV forms a protective capsid that is also infectious. So how to effectively block the process? The researchers said that by infecting the SP1 peptide molecules can effectively inhibit HIV protective capsid production.
 
Subsequently, researchers focused their attention on developing potential drugs to effectively block the production of infectious HIV by infecting the virus with mature processes. Researcher Perilla said that we must understand these short molecular fluctuations, the process of peptide capsid virus capsid, in order to add a capsid inhibitor to block the HIV maturation, we must continue to study to explore how exactly Medication can effectively block the generation of virus capsids, thereby inhibiting the production of infectious HIV.
 
In a later study, the researchers will also provide new treatments for the effective treatment of HIV patients through more in-depth research to develop new drugs based on the results of this study to inhibit the production of infectious HIV.
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